The 50s was characterized by significant changes in design, style and functionality of American cars of the time. This is known as the decade of automotive culture. Following the 2nd World War, the US economy grew rapidly due to the industrialization and commercialization of many new products which were invented or developed as a result of the war needs. After the war crisis, the decade began strongly regarding desires of consumption and production. It is estimated that in that decade, American factories produced 56.6 million family cars and 7.3 million vehicles bound for the agricultural and industrial production.

The war resulted in the increase of the roads connecting the entire country, so the cars began to be used and in demand for transportation throughout North America. This, combined with gas prices, generated considerable use of new vehicles. At the beginning, a gallon of gasoline (3.78 liters) cost 18 cents and 25 cents at the end.

The designs of the cars were gaining in length (L), their engines in power and they were lower and wider, as they say: lower, longer, and wider.

The chrome of the cars was becoming an essential aesthetic element and the most varied designs were used to compete with large companies as Ford, General Motor, and Chrysler.

Cuba has a wide variety of American cars of the 50s. Many are maintained with the efforts of Cubans, some over love and others over necessity. The splendor of the island in that decade has left thousands of cars driving through the city to the attraction of tourists and to meet the transportation needs of this country.